Archive for June, 2009

06 26th, 2009

Psychological dependency is addressed in many drug rehabilitation centers by attempting to teach the patient new methods of interacting in a drug-free environment. In particular, drug rehab patients are generally encouraged or required not to associate with friends who still use the addictive substance. Twelve-step programs encourage addicts not only to stop using alcohol or other drugs, but to examine and change habits related to their addictions. Many luxury residential drug rehab programs emphasize that recovery is a permanent process without culmination. For legal drugs such as alcohol, complete abstention—rather than attempts at moderation, which may lead to relapse—is also emphasized (”One drink is too many; one hundred drinks is not enough.”) Whether moderation is achievable by those with a history of drug abuse remains a controversial point but is generally considered unsustainable.

Various types of programs offer help in drug rehabilitation, including: interventions, residential treatment (in-patient), out-patient, local support groups, extended care centers, and sober houses. Some psychotherapists question the validity of the “diseased person” model used within the drug rehabilitation environment. Instead, they state that the individual person is entirely capable of rejecting previous behaviors. Further, they contend that the use of the disease model of addiction simply perpetuates the addicts’ feelings of worthlessness, powerlessness, and inevitably causes inner conflicts that would be easily resolved if the addict were to approach addiction as simply behavior that is no longer productive, the same as childhood tantrums. Drug rehabilitation does not utilize any of these ideas, inasmuch as they intrinsically contradict the assumption that the addict is a sick person in need of help.

Traditional addiction treatment is based primarily on counseling. However, recent discoveries have shown that those suffering from addiction often have chemical imbalances that make the recovery process more difficult.